How Sitting is Killing You – Part 2

Sitting is Killing You – Yeah, it’s Still Bad For you

In my last blog post, I talked about the negative consequences associated with excessive sitting. I brought up how sitting all day decreases metabolic-rate and ruins healthy posture. Today, we’ll continue the crusade against sitting on our butts all day. Time to save some lives, because sitting is killing you.

Let’s get to it.

Sitting Reduces Blood Circulation

This is an obvious one, albeit it is not easy to find medical studies that prove this with quantifiable results. Just Google “sitting poor circulation” and you’ll see what I mean. There are lots of informational stuff on respectable websites, such as Mayo Clinic, but nothing really confirming the notion that sitting reduces blood circulation in the legs.

I guess we’re going to have to trust the logic that claims if you keep a part of your body immobilized and inactive for hours at a time, there will be poor circulation in the said body part.

Anyway, there are numerous downsides to poor circulation, as listed on poorcirculation.org. Cold extremities, numbness, localized hair loss, dry skin, varicose or spider veins, and cramping are all symptoms of poor circulation.

Is it just or, or it do those symptoms sound like localized tissue aging, or even death? I’s almost as if the areas that have poor circulation are falling apart while these rest of the body is maintaining its youth.

Well, when you decrease the ability of a tissue to receive nutrients via blood circulation, you are more-or-less slowly starving the area to death.

That’s another more strike against sitting and it actually harming your health.

Statistically, Sitting is Associated with Increased Mortality

I’m going to just lay it out straight for you guys. A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology found that “time spent sitting was independently associated with total mortality, regardless of physical activity level.” Yeah, that’s right, sitting kills you. What. The. Hell.

So, even if you workout at 6am before going to your 9-to-5 office job, you’re still at risk of increased chances of disease and death. Now, isn’t that motivating? It sort of makes you want to give up and just gorge on some fast food.

No need to fret, however. That doesn’t mean the dedication and effort you put forward was for nothing. Did you lose weight and pack on muscle, or get closer to reaching your fitness goals? I’m sure you did – but the findings in the study tell us that if we seek longevity and optimal health, we’ve got bigger things to tackle than an early-morning workout.

It tells us that a big indicator of health is not just the amount of daily physical activity, but also the amount of daily physical inactivity. So, for the people who sit all day at work, you’ve got another obstacle to overcome. Thankfully, standing desks, treadmill desks, and squatting desks are all out on the market for people like you.

It’s easier said than done to get your boss to consider implementing these kind of workstations, but I’m sure if you bring up “ergonomics”, “work-related injuries”, or “worker’s compensation” to your human resources manager, your requests will be taken seriously – especially now that we know sitting can literally kill you.

In Conclusion

We know from the previous installment of “How Sitting is Killing You” that this lazy act creates bad posture and reduces your the amount of calories you burn in one day. Bad posture can negatively affect how you move, and burning less calories means increased fat storage.

Today, we’ve learned that sitting also causes poor circulation and is associated with increased mortality. Let’s hope this was a wake up call for everyone. It needs to be realized that sitting all the time is bad and can literally kill you.

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One Comment

  1. Photo Credits
    Mark Twain sitting. Author: unknown. commons.wikimedia.com

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